Saving Grandpa’s Stories – and Grandma’s Too

Most of us have old family stories we wished we’d saved or written down. Janet will help you decide the purpose of saving your stories. A family memento with photos? A personal memoir? A cookbook with stories? A family story to record into Story Core?

She’ll present tips on how to find an opening line and how to build details onto the bones of your story by adding description. She’ll give resources on e-books and traditional publishing and help you learn how to use StoryCorps for verbal recordings. You’ll receive tips on jogging stories from parents or grandparents who may have memory loss and how to use simple tools like a digital recorder or a smart phone to capture those stories. Full day workshops include writing practice and feedback.

Upcoming Workshops

April 30, 2016, 2 p.m. Missouri Writers Guild Conference
Hotel Hilton Kansas City Airport

July 23, 2016. All day workshop
Pioneer Bluffs, Matfield, Kansas

3 thoughts on “Saving Grandpa’s Stories – and Grandma’s Too

  1. A great picture by the way. Family of yours? That photo is probably pre-WWI. The lady is quite beautiful. I always think that if those people were alive and just changed clothes, no-one would notice. Says how close we are. 🙂

    1. My grandparents. Grandpa Joe was from the Kentucky Blue Mountains who followed the railroad to Otego, Kansas and wooed a Quaker girl, Margaret Moore. He became a depot agent and his fingers could fly on the telegraph key. She was a poet. They were both readers. Her grandmother, Lucinda Moore migrated across the country picking up husbands after the previous died and arrived in Kansas with W. Moore at the end of the so called “Indian Wars.” She lived in a dugout until she died at 92. That there is whatcha call Kansas pioneer stock.
      I like teaching. I’m glad I get to keep doing it and looking forward to teaching a memoir class online in July.
      Okay, Brian. I’m guessing you’re a journalist of some kind and you emigrated from Africa.

  2. In this day and age of constant change, memory is vastly underrated. And yet, memory (ours, and our ancestors’) are what make us who we are… Sounds like a great workshop.

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